Did You Know

  • The Video Gaming Act supplies much needed money for treatment services. 25% of the over $6 Million in license fees each year will go to the Dept. of Human Services for treatment of compulsive gambling. There currently is no mandated funding for DHS under all other forms of gaming in the state. 

  • The Video Gaming Act supplies about 30% of the funds needed for the $31 Billion Capital Construction Fund which creates an estimated 489,000 jobs for all of Illinois.

  • The Video Gaming Act allows local municipalities to receive 1/6 of the tax revenue generated in their community with no restrictions on its use.

  • The Video Gaming Act allows a minimum wager of 5 cents and a max of $2 with a max prize of $500, the same amount authorized under the Bingo Act. This is lower than any state in the nation. This keeps video gaming in a recreational context.

  • "Researchers state that organized crime is more of a product of illegal or poorly regulated gambling than well-regulated gambling." source - California Research Bureau

  • That members of the Illinois Legislature have been studying video gaming in other states for over 15 years before passing the Video Gaming Act. During this time several dozen public hearings have been held on the subject by various committees.

  • The Video Gaming Act mandates that all devices be connected to a state managed central system that will monitor the integrity of each unit as well as financial data from every business involved. There are no such controls in place at riverboats in Illinois.

  • Studies support the notion that a majority of those who gamble do so responsibly and without problems (National Research Council, 1999; Petry, 2005). Fewer than 2% of the population across a variety of international jurisdictions evidence gambling-related problems that meet diagnostic criteria (Petry, 2005). source - Journal of Gambling & Business Economics - 2008

  • That the National Opinion Research Council in a study by the University of Chicago did not find that so-called convenience gambling, is more likely than other forms of gambling to be associated with pathological gambling. source - Public Sector Gaming Study

  • Based on the published South Dakota crime rate, however, it does not appear that there is a proportionately larger incidence of crime per 100,000 residents from the period of expansive gaming operations in 1989 to those reported in 2000. In fact, the crime index from 1989 [2,685.2] compared to 2000 [2,319.8]  and [1,628] in 2007 is lower. Nation-wide statistics showed South Dakota with one of the lowest crime index rates.

  • “There is no solid basis for concluding that the wider legalization of gambling, which has cut into illegal gambling and friendly betting, has caused a concomitant increase in pathological gambling. In fact, it appears that pathological gambling is quite rare within the general population, [and] it does not appear to be increasing in frequency.”  Source - Public Sector Gambling Impact Study Commission

  • The congressionally mandated National Gambling Impact Study Commission found in 1999 that while there has been a “massive and rapid transformation” of American life over the past two decades, during which gambling changed from “a limited and relatively rare phenomenon” to a “common feature of everyday life, readily accessible in one form or another to the vast majority of Americans,” its finding on the prevalence of pathological gambling was no different than the finding of a national commission in the mid-1970s, which estimated that about 0.8 percent of Americans were “probable compulsive gamblers.”